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dc.creatorHolmes, David Salway
dc.creatorJedlicki Corbeaux, Eugenia Maria
dc.creatorQuatrini Nyqvist, Raquel Clara
dc.creatorValdes, Jorge
dc.date.accessioned2016-12-27T21:51:18Z
dc.date.available2016-12-27T21:51:18Z
dc.date.issued2007
dc.identifier.isbn978-1-4020-5588-1
dc.identifier.isbn978-1-4020-5589-8
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10533/165831
dc.description.abstractWith about 300 fully sequenced bacterial and archaeal genomes and with additional information of hundreds of thousands of DNA and protein sequences in public databases it is possible to predict genes and their putative protein products in DNA sequences derived from genome sequencing projects. In about 60% of the cases putative functions can be assigned to the predicted proteins. These assignments can range from near certainty to deep speculation, highlighting the need for subsequent experimental validation of the predictions. High-throughput sequencing, microarray screening and protein expression profiling technologies drive discovery efforts in today's genomics and proteomic laboratories. These tools allow researchers to generate massive amounts of data, at a rate orders of magnitude greater than scientists ever anticipated. In this chapter, we provide a general overview of how bioinformatics and genome biology can provide insight into the genomic organization and function of biomining microorganisms with a special reference to Acidithiobacillus ferrooxidans about which most is known. Bioinformatics and genome biology are effective tools for making preliminary inroads into how an otherwise uncharacterized organism functions. It is particularly powerful in cases where it is difficult to implement conventional genetic tools such as in the case of several bioleaching microorganisms. Bioinformatics and genome biology are effective tools for making preliminary inroads into how an otherwise uncharacterized organism functions. It is particularly powerful in cases where it is difficult to implement conventional genetic tools such as in the case of several bioleaching microorganisms and results are beginning to emerge to support this view (e.g. Selkov et al., 2000; Barreto et al., 2003; Appia-Ayme, 2005; Quatrinia et al., 2005).The Use Of Bioinformatics And Genome Biology To Advance Our Understanding Of Bioleaching Microorganisms (PDF Download Available). Available from:
dc.language.isoeng
dc.relationinstname: Conicyt
dc.relationreponame: Repositorio Digital RI2.0
dc.relationinstname: Conicyt
dc.relationreponame: Repositorio Digital RI 2.0
dc.relation.urihttp://link.springer.com/book/10.1007%2F1-4020-5589-7
dc.titleTHE USE OF BIOINFORMATICS AND GENOME BIOLOGY TO ADVANCE OUR UNDERSTANDING OF BIOLEACHING MICROORGANISMS
dc.typeCapitulo de libro
dc.countryHOLANDA
dc.bibliographicCitation.stpage221
dc.bibliographicCitation.endpage239
dc.identifier.folio1050063
dc.description.conicytprogramFONDECYT
dc.relation.projectidinfo:eu-repo/grantAgreement/Fondecyt/1050063
dc.relation.setinfo:eu-repo/semantics/dataset/hdl.handle.net/10533/93479
dc.rights.driverinfo:eu-repo/semantics/openAccess
dc.type.driverinfo:eu-repo/semantics/bookPart
dc.description.shortconicytprogramFONDECYT
dc.title.libroMICROBIAL PROCESSING OF METAL SULFIDES
dc.creator.libroDonati, Edgardo R.
dc.creator.libroSand, Wolfgang
dc.description.libropages326
dc.publisher.editorialSPRINGER


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